A Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James Blades

A Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James Blades
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A Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James BladesA Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James BladesA Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James Blades
A Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James BladesA Photographic Archive of Percussion Instruments, collected by the Percussion historian James Blades

James Blades.

c.1960s-1980s. 3 photograph albums of varied size and binding containing over 200 illustrations, predominately b&w photographs. Over 160 loose illustrations, predominately b&w photographs, the majority housed in mailing envelopes. Volume 1 on the albums is titled 'A Pictorial Survey of Orchestral Percussion Instruments and their origins. (J.B). The illustrations in volume 1 are numbered and captioned by hand, but not in volumes 2 & 3. Many of the photographs have annotations by Blades to the rear. 335 x 290mm (13 x 11"). 5.5kg. . English. Very good; some occasional light wear to the photographs, but generally in very good condition; the glue to the albums has yellowed in places, some photos are loosening in vol. 3, cellophane overlay occasionally peeled back in vols. 2 & 3.

An extensive archive of photographs and illustrations of percussion instruments amassed by the British percussionist and percussion historian James Blades (1901-1999). Over 350 images, the majority being black-and-white photographs, illustrate an enormous range of instruments from across the world and across the centuries. There are some bronze cymbals (crotales) from Egypt c. 850 BC, a decorated Chinese drum called a po-fu, the Distin Mammoth Bass drum (8ft 6in in diameter and made from the hide of a prize animal at the London Cattle Show 1860), the 30 inch Chinese tam-tam used by Blades to record the sound effect for Rank's trademark gong title sequence.
Blades was one of the most influential percussionists of the twentieth century. He was Professor of Percussion at the Royal Academy of Music, he collaborated with Benjamin Britten as his percussion advisor, and he provided the sound effect for Rank Organisation's famous gong sequence. He was also the author of numerous books on the history of percussion, including 'Percussion Instruments and Their History' (1970). The photographs and illustrations present here undoubtedly formed part of Blades' research and reference for his books. The annotations on the reverse include notes on the objects as well as cropping and sizing marks. Several of the photographs illustrate pieces from Blades' own collection and his notes indicate specific Britten operas and other performances where they were used.

Price :  £200.00
Was:  £300.00